Classical Spree 17-18

14.The Solo Tuba Takes on Don Quixote

14.The Solo Tuba Takes on Don Quixote

SEASON PARTNER

Salle Claude-Léveillée

Virtuoso tuba player Austin Howle, who enjoys an international career as a soloist, has a dazzling treat for Montreal music lovers: a rich selection of works for tuba, accompanied by outstanding pianist Pamela Reimer.

 

YOUTH RATE 17 years and under : $10 per concert

TICKETS PRICES

From $10*

SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 1 2018

1:15 PM

Redirection to the Place des Arts

Austin Howle, tuba
Pamela Reimer, piano

 

Dumitru Ionel, Rumanian Dance no. 2 (2 min.)

Ravel, Don Quichotte à Dulcinée (7 min.)

Hindemith, Sonata for Bass Tuba and Piano (11 min.)

Fritz Kreisler, La Gitana (5 min.)

Alec Wilder, Suite no. 1 for Tuba and Piano, “Effie Suite” (11 min.)

Programme Notes:

Don Quichotte à Dulcinée – Ravel’s last completed work – was originally intended for a G. W. Pabst film based on Cervantes’s Don Quixote, starring the famous bass singer Feodor Chaliapin. Ravel was abruptly fired from the film in 1932, but he completed these three highly colourful songs for baritone and piano (or orchestra). They are among his many evocations of Spanish music. Ravel’s lifelong interest in Spain was rooted in his mother’s Basque and Spanish origins, and the Spanish-inspired works are filled with dance rhythms and stereotypically Spanish touches such as long melismas, decorative flourishes and modal inflections. Here, the opening “Chanson Romanesque” incorporates the hemiola rhythm of the Spanish quajira as Don Quixote defies anything that might offend his lady. His bravado concludes with extended rhapsodizing on the final “Ô Dulcinée….” “Chanson épique” is a prayer of gratitude to the Archangel Michael. An asymmetrical Basque rhythm gives this movement sustained, quiet urgency, while chant-like parallel harmonies evoke early Christian liturgy. In “Chanson à boire,” Ravel joyfully depicts the drunken Don with flourishes from both soloist and piano, like peals of laughter or sparkling wine.

 

The concert opens with the fiery and virtuosic Second Rumanian Dance by tuba virtuoso Dumitru Ionel. Paul Hindemith’s wide-ranging Sonata for Bass Tuba is an easygoing and expressive showpiece, while the catchy and evocative La Gitana, composed by world-famous violinist Fritz Kreisler, provides another dance number. The top of Kreisler’s score is marked “After an 18th century Arabo-Spanish Gypsy song.”

 

This program showcases the tuba as an instrument of enormous depth and range, capable of assimilating many different musical languages. The tuba’s own rich idiom contains unique opportunities for lyricism, expression, and technical display – as well as for humour and playfulness. This is especially evident in Alec Wilder’s “Effie Suite,” which plays delightfully with the image of tuba as elephant. This affable children’s piece narrates the adventures of Effie the Elephant as she frolics, dances, and finally settles down to sleep.

 

© Ariadne Lih, 2018

Austin Howle

Austin Howle has served as Principal Tuba of the Orchestre symphonique de Montréal since 2013. A native of Oxford, Mississippi, he has performed in ensembles across 15 countries, most recently in China and Japan.  He has played with the Houston Symphony on numerous occasions, and he served as Acting Principal Tuba of the Iceland Symphony Orchestra in 2011. As a soloist, he performed at the Kennedy Center as part of the 2011 Millennium Stage Conservatory Project. He earned a Master of Music degree from Rice University, where he studied with David Kirk, and a Bachelor of Music degree from Florida State University, where he studied with Paul Ebbers. His other principal teachers have included Chester Schmitz and Michael Grose.

Pamela Reimer

Pamela Reimer is a pianist, coach, teacher, and arranger based in Montreal. She has performed extensively throughout Canada, in the U.S., and the UK. In 2016, she was nominated for an Opus Prize along with flutist Marie-Hélène Breault for their concert “Mes Hommages.”  Their CD of the same name will be released in 2018. She has performed, toured, and made numerous recordings with Orford Six Pianos, Blue Rider Ensemble, Bradyworks, Ensemble contemporain de Montréal, Erreur de type 27, Concerto Della Donna, and percussionist Beverley Johnston. Pamela has been a featured soloist with Les Grands Ballets Canadiens, National Ballet of Canada, Orchestre symphonique de Drummondville, Cambridge Symphony, Plattsburgh Youth Orchestra, and the Champlain Valley Oratorio Society. Her performances of Shostakovich’s Preludes and Fugues, Claude Vivier’s Shiraz, and Elliott Carter’s Night Fantasies have been aired on CBC Radio. Pamela Reimer is currently Artist-in-Residence at Concordia University in Montreal.

Program Note:

Don Quichotte à Dulcinée – Ravel’s last completed work – was originally intended for a G. W. Pabst film based on Cervantes’s Don Quixote, starring the famous bass singer Feodor Chaliapin. Ravel was abruptly fired from the film in 1932, but he completed these three highly colourful songs for baritone and piano (or orchestra). They are among his many evocations of Spanish music. Ravel’s lifelong interest in Spain was rooted in his mother’s Basque and Spanish origins, and the Spanish-inspired works are filled with dance rhythms and stereotypically Spanish touches such as long melismas, decorative flourishes and modal inflections. Here, the opening “Chanson Romanesque” incorporates the hemiola rhythm of the Spanish quajira as Don Quixote defies anything that might offend his lady. His bravado concludes with extended rhapsodizing on the final “Ô Dulcinée….” “Chanson épique” is a prayer of gratitude to the Archangel Michael. An asymmetrical Basque rhythm gives this movement sustained, quiet urgency, while chant-like parallel harmonies evoke early Christian liturgy. In “Chanson à boire,” Ravel joyfully depicts the drunken Don with flourishes from both soloist and piano, like peals of laughter or sparkling wine.

 

The concert opens with the fiery and virtuosic Second Rumanian Dance by tuba virtuoso Dumitru Ionel. Paul Hindemith’s wide-ranging Sonata for Bass Tuba is an easygoing and expressive showpiece, while the catchy and evocative La Gitana, composed by world-famous violinist Fritz Kreisler, provides another dance number. The top of Kreisler’s score is marked “After an 18th century Arabo-Spanish Gypsy song.”

 

This program showcases the tuba as an instrument of enormous depth and range, capable of assimilating many different musical languages. The tuba’s own rich idiom contains unique opportunities for lyricism, expression, and technical display – as well as for humour and playfulness. This is especially evident in Alec Wilder’s “Effie Suite,” which plays delightfully with the image of tuba as elephant. This affable children’s piece narrates the adventures of Effie the Elephant as she frolics, dances, and finally settles down to sleep.

 

© Ariadne Lih, 2018

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